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The Impeccable Period Rooms In the Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Impeccable Period Rooms in the Metropolitan Museum of Art | Paint + Pattern

Incredible examples of interiors throughout the ages are available for anyone to see at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In case you can’t make the trip to New York, the rooms have been gorgeously photographed by Karin L. Willis for the book Period Rooms of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Most of  The Met’s Period Rooms are original, although some have been restored (and even unearthed!) and a few have been faithfully replicated. We hope you enjoy this visual tour – it’s just a few of the rooms the museum showcases.

The Van Rensselaer Hall at the Period Rooms in the Metropolitan Museum of Art | Paint + Pattern

The Van Rensselaer Hall is an entrance hall built in pre-Revolutionary America and was one of the grandest residences in the colonial era. Van Rensselaer spared no expense and hired master craftsmen for many aspects of the residence. The wallcovering, representing the Four Seasons, is hand painted in tempera and imported from England. Timeline: 1765-69.

The Hewlett Room at the Period Rooms in the Metropolitan Museum of Art | Paint + Pattern

The Hewlett Room is from America – Woodbury, NY to be exact. It features colonial American architectural elements and the painted cupboard reflects American decorative arts: garlands of fruit painted in grisaille. If you wanted to paint something similar on a preferred furniture piece, try the Nature, Fruit and Floral Stencils Collection from Royal Design Studio. Timeline: 1740 – 60.

The Parisian Crillon Room at the Period rooms in the Metropolitan Museum of Art | Paint + Pattern

The Parisian Crillon Room has gorgeous boiserie that has incredible decorative painting and gilding. The room is a modified octagon and boasts antique mirrors that would reflect the light from the singular light fixture throughout the room. Timeline: 1777-80.

The Frank Lloyd Wright Room form Minnesota's Little House at the period rooms in the metropolitan museum of art | Paint + Pattern

The Frank Lloyd Wright Room is really the living room from Minnesota’s Little House. The space exemplifies Wright’s idea of organic or spatial continuity, a constant and harmonious movement of design, pattern, interiors and exteriors – the concept that all are inextricably related. Timeline: 1912 – 1914.

Close up of Gubbio Studiolo at the period rooms of the Metropolitan Meseum of Art | Paint + Pattern

This is a close-up of the Gubbio Studiolo, a small study retreat from the Ducal Palace in Gubbio, Italy. The fantastic realization about this gorgeous trompe l’oeil work is that it is not painted at all. It is Perspective Intarsia, a Florentine Renaissance technique that creates a continuous illusion by wooden inlays. Different colors of wood provide different shadings. Timeline: 1478-82.

A 17th century Swiss Room at the period rooms at the Metropolitan museum of Art | Paint + Pattern

This is a 17th century Swiss Room from the Canton of Grisons, Switzerland. The rich chamber has elaborately carved paneled walls and a large, colorful ceramic fireplace.

Sagredo Bedroom at the period rooms in the Metropolitan museum of art | Paint + Pattern

Gold leaf, damask patterns, ornamental plaster and amorini sculptures combine for the visually explosive Sagredo Bedroom from the Palazzo Sagredo in Venice. The bed alcove has a marquetry floor original to the room. Timeline: 1718.

 Boscoreale Bedroom in the period rooms of the Metropolitan museum of art | Paint + Pattern

The Boscoreale Bedroom is a well-preserved Roman bedroom with fresco paintings. The artist has never been identified. Timeline: 40 – 30 B.C.

 Kirtlington Park Room at the period rooms in the Metropolitan museum of art | Paint + Pattern

The Kirtlington Park Room is an Oxfordshire dining room and widely regarded as one of the most beautiful Rococo rooms from England. The plasterwork was executed by artisan Thomas Roberts. In fact, it was his very first personal commission. Timeline: 1748.

Astor Garden Court at the period rooms in the Metropolitan museum of art | Paint + Pattern

The Astor Garden Court is modeled on a Ming dynasty courtyard in Suzhou, China.  A team of Chinese experts was assembled to create an authentic garden that would provide a place of rest for museum visitors.

The Nur al-Din Room at the period rooms in the Metropolitan museum of art | Paint + Pattern

The Nur al-Din Room was originally from Damascus, though research has not produced precise information on its provenance.  The room boasts incredible carved woodwork, marble, tile and decorative painting – seems like Modello® Designs heaven!  The room is twenty-two feet high, twenty-six feet long, sixteen feet wide and took three years to install.

Did you enjoy the visuals of some of the period rooms? The book has so many more in addition to thorough information on each of the design styles. Truly a feast for the eyes — I hope you consider looking into it! Drop us a line and let us know which one is your favorite!

3 comments

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